Entries Tagged as 'Interview'

10 Questions with Arren Williams

Aug 14, 2014

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Here at EQ3, we’ve decided to change it up! Each new interview will pose questions which we hope reveal something interesting or quirky about someone we admire. This month we’re featuring Arren Williams, the Creative Director, Home at Hudson’s Bay. (You can also shop EQ3 galleries at The Bay!) We’re aiming to inspire whether that takes form through food, books, travel, etc.. Questions and answers will be kept brief and each new interview will include a photograph taken by our feature someone!

 

View from Arren's desk, including a fresh espresso!

View from Arren’s desk, including a fresh espresso!

 

EQ3  What is your current obsession?

 

ARREN WILLIAMS  I live my life constantly design obsessed, but right now I’m very into craft beer, and always enjoy hunting down a local brew whenever I travel.

 

 

EQ3  What has been your drink of choice this summer?

 

AW  Other than beer, I have a bit of a thing for ice cold dry rosé.

 

 

EQ3  What was the last meal that wowed you?

 

AW  Açorda de Marisco, eaten in a little dockside restaurant in Olhão, southern Portugal. It’s a seafood stew made with bread, and it totally blew my socks off.

 

 

EQ3  In your opinion, what is the most essential coffee table book?

 

AW  I have a vintage Terence Conran ‘The House Book’ from 1974 that came off of a very stylish aunt’s bookshelf. That’s definitely a favourite.

 

 

EQ3  One lesson that changed your outlook on design?

 

AW  Stopping worrying about what other people will think.

 

 

EQ3  A room is never complete without ____________?

 

AW  In my case, a black and white Whippet named Spot.

 

 

EQ3  If you could only see the world in three colours, what three colours would they be and why?

 

AW  That is possibly the most bizarre question I have ever been asked. To be honest, I never limit myself when it comes to colour!

 

 

EQ3  Name the most inspirational place you’ve ever travelled to or would like to travel to.

 

AW  India. I’ve been a couple of times for work, but would love the chance to travel around the country.

 

 

EQ3  What is the most played song in your music library?

 

AW  We actually have a record player at home, so the other day Haircut One Hundred’s album, Pelican West, was on repeat. It took me back to my, ahem, younger days…

 

 

EQ3  What is THE conversation piece in your own home?

 

AW  It’s probably a toss-up between a vintage clown painting on our gallery wall and our rather obnoxiously loud, and heavily patterned, sofa.

 

 

Interview: Sam Grawe from Herman Miller

Jun 23, 2014

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We’ve referenced WHY, Herman Miller’s online essay series, a number of times on the blog. Through a collection of stories, interviews and videos, the essay series invites readers to discover why Herman Miller does what they do. Herman Miller has managed to make WHY playful, yet meaty - publishing a 4,000 word essay that doesn’t feel daunting, and a 108 second video that covers 108 years of design history.

 

Curious about the work that goes into developing these stories, we interviewed Sam Grawe, Editorial Director at Herman Miller, and the man behind the WHY series. Grawe has been interested in design since a young boy. In college, he studied art and architectural history, and it was there that he learned about 20th century design. Grawe went on to be the Editor-in-Chief of the popular architecture publication Dwell Magazine. After 11 years with the magazine, Grawe began working for Herman Miller, first as a consultant, and then as the full-time Editorial Director.

 

It comes as no surprise that he’s a modernist at heart, with Eames, Nelson and Girard topping his list of personal design heroes.

 

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Cover designs of Herman Miller’s WHY publication (print)

 

EQ3  What prompted you to move from consulting to working full-time with Herman Miller?

 

SAM GRAWE  There are very few truly design driven companies in the world, no less the United States, and Herman Miller has one of the most storied histories of design with Nelson, Eames, and Girard. All are longstanding personal heroes of mine, especially Nelson and Girard, with Nelson having been a magazine editor prior to being a furniture designer and working as the Creative Director at Herman Miller. I think it was the opportunity to work with such an incredible legacy, and to think about how to communicate that today.

 

In addition to that, just being a part of an organization that is really dedicated to problem solving design, and what that means in the 21st Century and moving forward.

 

 

EQ3  Have you always had an interest in design? Do you have a specific background in it, or is it something that has just come naturally to you?

 

SG  Actually, if I go back to my youth, I think I was pretty obsessed with Lego. Whether it was my parents telling me, or whether it was myself learning about it, I always thought I was going to be an architect. I studied architecture and architectural history, and I ended up ultimately studying art history. But, as I was studying art history, I got a little bit of 20th Century design history too.

 

Then I moved to the Bay Area in the late 90s and I became more and more interested in industrial design and furniture design. I knew that I wanted to work somehow in design. I was thinking at that time that I would go back to school for a design degree, but I ended up working for a guy named Bruce Burdick, who actually did the Burdick Table for Herman Miller in the early 80s. I worked for Bruce for probably 2 years in San Francisco, and then I started at Dwell (Magazine) in 2000, right after the first issue had been published.

 

Obviously, I had an amazing education at Dwell – eleven years there – and great exposure to contemporary architecture and to contemporary design. I had the opportunity to meet so many people and be exposed to so much. That was one of the great pleasures of that job.

 

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The Living Office is Herman Miller’s framework for understanding the future of office design.

 

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EQ3  Now, in your role at Herman Miller, what does a typical day look like for you as the Editorial Director.

 

SG  I don’t know if there is a typical day, but I am involved in a lot of different projects. I am in charge of all of the writing, but I am also in charge of my own editorial projects.

 

I also work really heavily with the brand design team that consists of all of the designers internally doing our spaces, our graphics and our digital work. “How are we conveying the messages that Herman Miller should be conveying? And, what medium are we going to use to convey it best?” And then, “How are we going to bring it to life?”

 

I’ve also been really heavily involved in the core team that has put together Living Office, which is the framework for Herman Miller’s understanding of the future of office design and work. I think anyone would tell you, at Herman Miller, that we’re kind of a meeting-based culture. There are a lot of cross-functional teams, and things happen in a pretty organic way amongst those teams.

 

 

EQ3  You mentioned about the variety of mediums that you work with. Is there a particular medium that you find most gratifying to work with?

 

SG  I think there is something, ultimately, always satisfying about print. It’s sort of finite. You can hold it in your hands, and it’s an object. Once you’re done, it’s done.

 

On the other hand, right now I have sort of an unabashed love for Instagram. I think Instagram is, for me, probably the most satisfying of social media, from both from a personal standpoint and I think we’ve been having a lot of fun with the Herman Miller Instagram account, as well. But it’s just because it’s visual, and in a way it feels less promotional than some other formats.

 

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“Alexander Girard: An Uncommon Vision” pop up celebrating first archival re-introductions of Girard’s furniture and screen printed fabric panels (New York Design Week, May 2014)

 

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EQ3  Do any particular projects, then, standout in your mind as a favourite?

 

SG  I’d have to say the recent work that we did with the pop-up showcase for Alexander Girard in New York.

 

I’ve always had a supreme passion for Alexander Girard, since a friend of mine introduced me, in probably 2001, to his work. It was less known than Nelson and Eames, at that time. In a lot of ways, his work was more ephemeral. He did textiles, and he did restaurant interiors and office interiors. Those are the kind of things that get changed or go away. I think, also, he did so much work that until you start digging, you don’t really realize that he was such a polymath and really did do everything. But when you start to discover his world, it’s just kind of amazing. It’s this endless trove of treasure.

 

In some ways it’s unfair to just put a table by him into the world, especially to a world that doesn’t know him as well as Eames or Nelson, without giving more context to what he accomplished in his lifetime.

 

 

EQ3  We’ve talked about the WHY series a fair bit on our blog and we really love it! We’re curious how this particular essay series developed because it’s a slightly different twist on a blog.

 

SG  My colleagues Steve Frykholmand Clark Malcom did a magazine called “See” in the mid 2000s, which was this beautiful high production value magazine that I think they did a total of 6 issues for, back in the day. They were just re-launching a new magazine called WHY, and that was one of the first projects that I worked on. We’ve done 3 print issues of WHY.

 

The idea is “Why does Herman Miller do the things that we do?” If there’s not a strong why, there’s kind of no point in doing it. And that’s, definitely, very much the ethos of how we approach things at Herman Miller – from our products, to our marketing, to everything. We want stuff to very much have purpose, and WHY is really the mechanism for bringing that conversation to life, whether it’s in print or it’s on social media, or in digital format. We launched last July online and I think we’ve produced something in the order of 35 stories in the last year.

 

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EQ3  Where do the ideas for stories come from? Where do you draw inspiration from?

 

SG  We work in a somewhat programmatic way with the marketing organization, so we base what we are doing on WHY with what the business is doing at the base level.

 

I’ve been able to bring in some great folk – my colleagues Amber Bravo and Everett Pelayo – that have a really good sense for editorial and for how to bring a story to life. Then we’ll take what is happening in the world of Herman Miller and we have editorial meetings. It’s a process almost like at any magazine. You have pitch meetings and you have creative meetings, and you sit around and you shoot around ideas. The one that kind of hits the nail on the head, or gets closest to it, is the one you pursue. But again, it comes back to “What’s the best way to bring this content to life.” We’re not married to any one approach. So sometimes it might be a video, sometimes it might be a photo essay, sometimes it might be a 2000 word interview.

 

 

Image Source: All photographs courtesy of Herman Miller

Interview: Beau Oyler from Urbio

May 28, 2014

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We snuck in a lunch-hour phone interview with Beau Oyler, the co founder and spokesperson for EQ3+ partner Urbio, just before he left for New York’s International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF)! Beau is an industrial designer based in Oakland, California. Together with his business partner Jared Aller, Beau started up Enlisted Design, a classic design agency that develops products for clients, including branding, packaging and industrial design. “It’s a super collaborative approach to design,” says Beau, “where we actually design with our clients here in the studio to create products with them.”

 

Then in 2010, after working on countless projects for other clients, Beau and Jared decided it was time for their studio to design a product of their own. They began brainstorming where there was a need for a well designed product, and what would make an impact in the world, not just in the design community. They came up with Urbio, an award-winning modular wall system that can be used as vertical garden in small urban spaces, as well as for wall organization and storage. Urbio launched in 2010 with a profitable Kickstarter campaign that raised close to $80,000 (one of the highest grossing Kickstarter campaigns in its time), and soon after they received a call from ABC’s Shark Tank inviting them to appear on the show.

 

The show was a huge success, and Urbio has gone on to win major design awards such as the prestigious Red Dot award and International Design Award (IDA).

 

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Portrait of Beau Oyler, Co-founder of Urbio and Principal at Enlisted Design

 

EQ3  How did Urbio come about?

 

BEAU OYLER  I grew up in Carmel, California – it’s just a small town on the coast – and my business partner grew up in the Midwest in Kansas City. So we both grew up in these quaint, suburb type towns where we had a garden and we had a yard. Then we up and move to San Francisco and Oakland and we no longer have space for anything like that and have no access to any types of gardens. I really wanted to re-connect with that idea – the idea of planting something and growing something.

 

So we began to design this modular magnetic wall planter system, where you’re able to take the pots off and water them and put them back on; and, to design it in such a way that every modern home and small space will want this on their wall – not just because it can grow their plants, but because it’s also beautiful.

 

 

EQ3 What are you working on right now / next?

 

BO  We have a bunch of new products that we’re going to be rolling out over the next 12 to 18 months, that are really going to expand the Urbio business. Our new product line, which is Urbio Organize, are very simple, very colourful plastic inserts that slip into existing Urbio posts and are dividers so you can divide mail, cards, pens, pencils, scissors and whatever is cluttering your desk. You are able to get it off your desk and organized within the Urbio system.

 

Because we do so well in the small space market like apartments, flats, and condos, lots of times people are renting and they’re not allowed to screw the plates into the wall. So we created this product called the wall puck. It’s this little powder-coated metal piece that you can screw with one screw into the wall. Or it comes with adhesive and you just peel the adhesive off and you could stick it on your bathroom mirror, you could stick it in a shower, or you could stick it on your wall. The Urbio pot just sticks to the little puck.

 

So it’s very simple, and that’s what all of our product line is going to be. It’s going to be simple products to help us organize in small spaces.

 

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EQ3  It’s obvious that you had a very clear vision from the get go. Did you have any specific inspiration or mentors that lead you in this direction?

 

BO  No, it was all pretty internal. Big companies and small companies come to Enlisted because there is this collaborative magic that we have. We are able to develop products that meet the needs of their consumers. So it really honestly did come from us saying, “we have done this for dozens and dozens and dozens of clients around the world, at what point do we do this for ourselves?” We turned a portion of our efforts from outward and fulfilling our clients’ needs to inward, using the skills that we have and kind of the magic that Enlisted has to design it for ourselves and design it from the ground up. It gave us creative freedom that we generally don’t have with clients, where we own the brand and we make those decisions.

 

 

EQ3  So if this was your first time being the client, what kind of client were you?

 

BO  That is a very good question. Being your own client is challenging. It’s great in some ways, and it’s challenging in some ways. Making the decisions as a team, rather than having the client make the final decision is a challenge because even though the general vision is shared, we have different perspectives on how that’s rolled out.

 

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Jared Aller, Co-founder of Urbio and Principal at Enlisted Design

 

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Christina Rotundo, Senior Graphic Designer

 

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Julian Bagirov, Senior Industrial Designer

 

EQ3  What are some of the most interesting ways people have used Urbio?

 

BO  There is this woman in New York who’s an interior designer, and she does a lot of work for the high-end retailers out there. She is actually amazing and she has used Urbio on drywall, on mirrors and on brick. She’s done a grass wall. Then she’s used the puck system and she’s hidden those into this grass wall, and then the Urbio pots were just used as the face.

 

It’s also really interesting where moms’ will use Urbio at a changing table. Evidently it holds perfectly diapers and wipes, and all those things that you need at a change table.

 

 

EQ3  You’ve had a lot of success in a short amount of time. What would you say has been one of your proudest moments or biggest accomplishments over the last few years?

 

I’m going to portion it into three categories – two of which are business, and one of which is just personal. For me being a product designer and a design entrepreneur, I love seeing products that I helped develop in retail. I love walking into EQ3 and seeing a standalone display of Urbio, or at The Container Store, or wherever.

 

The second one would be media. Shark Tank has been almost a life-changing experience. I say ‘almost’ because obviously getting married and having kids is more important and has been more life-changing, for sure. However, filming that show was very cool. My business partner and I have never been so much in sync as we were on the set that day. And just to be on the show where for four years I sat almost every Friday night and watched that show, and thought to myself one day I am going to be on the show.

 

And then third, just to get a little more local, is when friends text pictures of “hey I was helping my girlfriend unload the back of her car and check out what was in there.” And it’s the Big Happy Family. And they had no idea, they just saw it and loved it. Or friends who texted me in New York and said “hey check it out. I just walked into my friends flat and this was on the ground.” And it was the Urbio box that had just been delivered. Those are big wins! I’m still waiting for the big win for Michelle Obama to ask us to come and sell Urbio at the White House so she can grow an indoor wall garden!

 

 

Visit myurbio.com to learn more about Urbio product line. Also, follow the Urbio Facebook Page and @myurbio on Twitter and Instagram to see how others are using the products!

 

Image source: All photographs credited to Urbio

Interview: Tracey Ayton from Vancouver Vanishes

May 16, 2014

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Tracey Ayton is a Vancouver-based interiors and lifestyle photographer, whose work has appeared in prominent publications such as UPPERCASE, Style at Home and House & Home, as well as online at Kinfolk and House of Fifty. Tracey takes great interest in history and appreciates the quirks and character found in old architecture. She, herself, bought a turn-of-the-century-home in Vancouver’s Kerrisdale neighbourhood 11 years ago, and has since renovated it with her husband to celebrate its original beauty.

 

Vancouver’s popular West side (east of Kerrisdale) was once populated with the kinds of architectural gems that Tracey loves. The area boasted a vibrant family atmosphere and classic Arts & Crafts style homes. But in recent years, homes in this sought after neighbourhood have been disappearing. “Once you see a “For Sale” sign in front of it,” says Tracey, “you know the red fencing is sure to go up soon after. Old homes on Vancouver’s West side are like sitting ducks.” These homes are being scooped up by developers or wealthy investors who are looking to tear them down and make a profit. Most Vancouver residents are unable to compete with the prices these investors are willing to pay, and are forced to move out of the city and raise their families in more affordable suburb areas.

 

Enter Vancouver Vanishes, a community Facebook Page that is a lament for, and celebration of, the vanishing character homes in Vancouver. Tracey stumbled upon the page last year and immediately wanted to be apart of it. She now joins Vancouver Vanishes’ founder and author Caroline Adderson in documenting West side homes slated for demolition.

 

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EQ3  Tell us about Vancouver Vanishes.

 

TRACEY AYTON  Vancouver Vanishes is a Community Facebook Page. My co-worker who started it all is Caroline Adderson. She started taking pictures of these homes that were slated for demolition and documented them. It got to be so much that she started a Facebook Page, because she thought she should draw attention to what’s going on in our city.

 

I stumbled upon this page and I just thought “Wow, this is amazing.” She wrote down the year it was built, the first owner, and the owner’s occupation. I found this really interesting. One of the reasons why I live here is because I have a great appreciation for history and heritage. So I approached Caroline and I said “Hey look, I am a photographer, my subjects are homes and interiors, and I do have a passion for history.”

 

We travel to the west side of Vancouver 2-3 times a week, and go into houses that we have permission to enter and take pictures, both inside and out. Then we document them on the page.

 

 

EQ3  For our readers who may not understand Vancouver’s real estate market, can you explain what’s going on there and why these homes are getting torn down?

 

TA  Vancouver is an interesting and beautiful place to buy property. The west side is extremely popular. People with money will buy up anything and most likely tear it down in order to suit their needs. A lot of times it is just investment interests. They will tear down a house with a front and a back yard, and then they’ll build something that covers 70% of the lot, the maximum allowed.

 

After that you expect a family to move in, but often they don’t. They just sit on the house for profit, and they’ll sell it for quite a bit more money than they bought it for. It’s sort of diminishing the feel of our neighbourhoods because one-by-one these pockets of the city aren’t vibrant anymore.

 

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EQ3  What are the conditions of these houses?

 

TA  It could be an elderly person’s home that’s out of date and out of shape, but most recently there have been homes that are in perfect condition. They’ve been renovated, painted and brought up to date with electrical, you name it, but it just doesn’t matter when the house is bought as a building lot. The new buyer, who may not be living in the house, doesn’t want the upkeep of a garden.

 

 

EQ3  You’re a sought after interior and lifestyle photographer for some very prominent magazines in Canada. What goes through your mind when you’re shooting for Vancouver Vanishes?

 

TA  I think I tend to shoot in a bit of an artistic way. I’ve got a certain eye and it’s kind of artsy, and I try to apply that with these homes. The character of the homes – the bones – they immediately stand out, and that’s exactly what I want to photograph. Some of them have beautiful stained glass, chair rails, and fireplace mantels. I somehow seam it all together in one shot, or I break it up, just as long as it shows the character. But on the other end, I like to show the destruction of the house. So I might shoot a broken window that used to be stained glass – perfect, beautiful stained glass broken.

 

It evokes a feeling. I think I want people to be touched by these homes and what they used to offer. It’s sad, but they’re still standing with so much beauty in them, no matter how much people have ripped out. I guess I just try to capture that.

 

 

EQ3  You mentioned that it evokes a feeling. What feelings do these homes evoke in you?

 

TA  It’s bittersweet because they are such beautiful homes. It’s stuff that you just don’t see being built anymore. You see these good bones, and you know that whatever is going to be built after this is not going to be as intricate.

 

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EQ3  We really loved the post you recently published on The Dorothies – a pair of homes that Vancouver Vanishes recently helped rescue from demolition! How did you manage to save these two homes?

 

TA  Well, WE didn’t save them! They were saved by the city’s Heritage Revitalization Agreement, which is one of the few heritage tools the city has. Caroline had noticed the houses and approached the developer, who was going to tear them down to build his own house and one for a friend. She arranged to get a key and go inside to photograph. Later, when the development application went forward, Caroline posted the photos and encouraged people to write letters in support of saving the houses. The press got wind of it and articles appeared in The Vancouver Sun and the Province, provoking public outcry. The developer eventually had a change of heart when he realized if he moved the houses, the city would relax some of its zoning requirements, which made the project financially feasible. It was a win for the houses, the developer, and heritage.

 

 

EQ3  If you could get one message across, what would it be?

 

TA  Just to make people aware of what’s happening. The more people that are aware of it, the more we can help change the laws to save these buildings. All I can do is document these homes and show people what Vancouver used to look like when I was here. I’m a fourth generation Vancouverite, so I have pictures of when my parents lived here. And, I have pictures of when my grandparents were here, and when my great-grandparents were here. I hang onto that dearly.

 

If there is a way that we could figure out how to stop tearing down homes that shouldn’t be torn down, then maybe that’s all I hope for.

 

 

Image source: All photos by Tracey Ayton for Vancouver Vanishes

Interview: Tiffany MacKay, EQ3 Calgary’s Shop at Home Consultant

Mar 21, 2014

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Buying furniture is an investment, and EQ3 wants to make the shopping experience as fun and stress-free as possible! Our store staff love to inspire customers with beautiful and creative room settings, but many customers need additional help to envision the furniture they see in-store, in their own home.

 

That’s where EQ3′s Free In Home Consultation program comes in! We’ve equipped each EQ3 retail store with a Shop at Home consultant – a trained designer who will meet you right in your home and offer advice on furniture selections and layouts, right down to the colours and accessories that’ll complete your room.

 

We called up Tiffany MacKay, EQ3 Calgary’s Shop at Home Consultant, to talk about the program and what a customer can expect from the Shop at Home experience. Tiffany also shared her best tips for furnishing a home.

 

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Portrait of Tiffany, EQ3 Calgary Shop at Home Consultant

 

EQ3  What is your educational and work background?

 

TIFFANY MACKAY  I started in theatre and film. I got a degree in set and costume design from the University of Calgary. What’s kind of interesting, and why I think that is so key to my success, is that when you work in theatre you design spaces for a character, and how their home looks represents what they’re wearing and how they behave. So when I got to somebody’s house it’s about them, not necessarily what I think they should have.

 

After university, I worked for many different companies doing visual merchandising, and really focused on spacial relations.Then I started doing private consultations and working for a building developer, and now I’ve been with EQ3 for four years.

 

 

EQ3  What does the Shop at Home design process look like? What can a customer expect out of the experience?

 

TM  Typically, per room, the consultation’s about an hour. It’s a no obligation service, but hopefully the client is interested in EQ3 products and styles. When I go to somebody’s house, the first thing I always try to ask them is what they’re thinking of their space, what they’re hoping to get out of the consultation, maybe what they’re struggling with. Is it room layout, is it scale, is it colour, is it size? I always say to them “It’s your hour, so let’s talk about what you’re struggling with.”

 

Most often than not, I’ll go to appointments regarding upholstery. I try to think through the entire room, so that even if the client can’t afford to do all the pieces right now, at least they’re set up for success.

 

 

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Condo featuring EQ3′s Replay Sofa and Simone End Table (room shot from Tiffany’s portfolio)

 

EQ3  What services do you offer?

 

TM  It depends if the client is in their home, or if they’re building their home. If they are in their home, I’d show up with a giant suitcase with all the fabric swatches. I’d move in for an hour and we’d layout the space. We’d look at the colours. I always bring paint samples too in case someone wants to paint based off of the materials they select. And then, at that point, if they’re still struggling with visualization, I like to measure (the space) when I’m in the home, and then I can provide a 3D rendering.

 

Typically when somebody’s not in the house, and they just have blueprints, that’s when we do a lot of 3D rendering. I always prepare a little package for them. They can take home all of the swatches that they picked and we do some before and after pictures.

 

And then, with most appointments, I do invite clients back into the store one more time. I refer to it as the last ’bum test’ on the sofa so they can make sure they love it and feel confident that what they’re purchasing is the right choice for them. Because there’s no point in selling someone furniture that they’re not going to love. I always joke with people that I don’t want to see them back again unless we’re doing another room.

 

 

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Condo featuring EQ3′s Reverie Sofa, Solo Chairs and Cast Floor Lamp (room shot from Tiffany’s portfolio)

 

EQ3  Tell us about a favourite project or two that you’ve worked on.

 

TM I hate to play favourites. I’ve done everything from 500 square foot condos to 4,000 square foot homes. I fall in love with the people I deal with. It’s really satisfying to have somebody come back into the store and tell me how much they love it and show pictures.

 

In this one instance with a client I worked with, she said to me that the consultation felt more like a friend giving her advice on what would work, but with her best interest at heart. Because I think sometimes when you get advice from friends, it’s their opinion instead of what’s going to work best for (your) lifestyle.

 

We also did a huge crown suite in the Westin. That was quite memorable. When Presidents and dignitaries from other countries come and stay at the Westin Downtown, we did that suite for them. That was tons of fun!

 

 

EQ3  What are your favourite EQ3 products to design with?

 

TM  I love the Reverie Sofa. I love it because it looks cool, but it’s also super comfortable. I’m a big fan of mid-century design. I love that we carry Herman Miller, and I love that products like the Reverie can be complementary to their high end designs.

 

I quite like the Mesa Dining Table as well. I love marble. I think that there’s something polished and elegant about it, and if you can’t afford granite, quartz or marble countertops, it’s a way to incorporate that element into your home.

 

In terms of accessories, I love the Sitara Rug. I like the idea of a summer and a winter rug. I feel like that adds an element of longevity. The Sitara’s great in the winter for its cozy, knit appeal, and I like the Ori in the summer. It has a little thinner pile, so it’s easier to maintain if you’re in and out of the house with your flip flops.

 

 

Tiffany-EQ3-Shop-at-Home-consultant-Condo01

Condo featuring EQ3′s Elise Sofa and Rubix Ottomans (room shot from Tiffany’s portfolio)

 

EQ3  Do you have any tips for any readers who are furnishing their homes?

 

TM  I think less is more. I know a lot of people are in a rush to get things done. If you take your time and make the right choice – no band-aid solutions – you get the right piece, in the right space, and you actually don’t spend as much money.

 

You can always add, but it’s difficult to take away, especially furniture because it is a larger investment.

 

 

EQ3  What does your own home look like?

 

TM  I’m an artist, so I have lots of artwork on the wall. It has a very beachy, California vibe. I’m bold: I have a coloured sofa. It’s Key Largo Teal, which is a vibrant blue. I’m a bit of a book nut, so I’ve got lots of bookshelves, and I organize the books all by colour. I also have lots of pieces from EQ3 and my travels.

 

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