Entries Tagged as 'Inspiration'

The Craft: A Conversation with Przemek Pyszczek

Aug 25, 2014

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View of Pyszczek’s studio in Berlin, 2014

View of Pyszczek’s studio in Berlin, 2014

 

Winnipeg is a creative hub and many of our aesthetically-driven residents have attended the University of Manitoba’s Environmental Design program focusing on Interior Environments, Architecture, or Landscapes. In fact, many of our Winnipeg-based employees have graduated from the program. This month, we reached out to fellow Environmental Design graduate, visual artist, and Berlin resident Przemek Pyszczek. Pyszczek went to school with EQ3’s Creative Director, Thom Fougere, and is good friends with EQ3’s Visual Coordinator, Clifford Goodwill.

 

This is our conversation:

 

Where did you grow up and where do you consider home?

I was born in Poland and moved to Winnipeg as a child. Presently I live in Berlin. In response to where I consider home, that’s complicated. My parents live in Winnipeg, however, they moved out of my childhood home during my time in Berlin, so coming back doesn’t have the same nostalgic feeling anymore. As such, I would consider Berlin home because even though I don’t have a nostalgic connection to the city at this point, it is the city that is most in tune with my personality and way of life.

 

How has your education background influenced your work?

The Environmental Design program reinforced my interest in architecture and urbanism, causing me to always observe my surroundings. As my work deals with the physical and social landscape of pre/post-communist era Poland, this has directly influenced my work.

 

When and why did you move to Berlin?

I moved to Berlin in the summer of 2010. I had visited a few times before and really liked the city as it is a large capital and there is always something going on, yet remains very relaxed with no sense of urban chaos. Additionally, I felt an urgency to engage as an artist on a broader international scale, and I knew Berlin was an important art capital that still felt accessible.

 

How has Berlin influenced your art practice?

Berlin is a very international city, with a number of galleries, museums, and other cultural institutions. It is important as an artist to not be stuck within your own head and your own practice, but to be cognizant of what has happened artistically in the past and what is currently happening. Berlin facilitates a constant education for both local and visiting artists.

 

The work I have been making over the last few years has directly resulted from my regular travels to Poland. As Berlin is only an hour from the Polish border, I have been going to Poland very regularly over the last four years. These visits have really made me notice all of the elements I have become obsessed with in my research. While my subject matter is based in Poland, I also appreciate the distance I have living in Berlin as each time I come back, it is like looking with new eyes. Living elsewhere would not allow me to be this engaged.

 

Façade, 2014

Façade, 2014

 

What is the conceptual basis for your current work?

My work is an analysis and deconstruction of memory and physical space. More specifically, I am looking at the contemporary Polish urban landscape, and my relation to it. After World War II, due to the resulting devastation, a rapid program of reconstruction was enacted. A large proportion of construction was realized using a number of prefabricated modular building systems. Concrete panels would be made in a factory, and then brought on site to be quickly assembled into a building. These buildings could be anywhere from three stories, to 20 stories tall, using the same panels.

 

Every sort of life function – housing, schools, offices, hospitals – could be built this way. My father worked as a construction worker on these types of buildings. A very small crew of people (4-6) could build an entire floor of a building in one day. This type of residential construction often resulted in large housing estates with a great number of identical buildings. The resulting landscape and my connection to it is what I am ultimately exploring in my work.

 

Façade, 2014

Façade, 2014

 

What inspires your approach?

The paintings are essentially deconstructed building facades. After communism, the buildings had to be dealt with as they were drab, grey concrete, and had issues relating to insulation. So what happens is that the buildings are covered in styrofoam to add insulation, and then stuccoed. The stucco is then painted, but often the buildings are painted on all sides with a wrap-around graphic mural.

 

On the ground and first floor, residents in these buildings often install security bars, which they have made by a local metal worker. As you travel throughout Poland, you can see that people really go to town on customizing their small section of a very repetitive building. Some of the bars are very simple, but others are very expressive.  So the paintings take a section of the graphic facade, and combine them with a section of the security bars to convey this fascinating aesthetic that permeates the contemporary Polish landscape.

 

Another aspect of these housing estates that really fascinated me was the playgrounds in amongst the buildings. I was drawn to them because they looked like abstract sculpture and not playground structures. I then noticed that similar forms would appear throughout Poland, but they were not made by one factory as they were all a bit different. I had these reconstructed by metal workers in Poland who had also had a connection and memory to these forms. I then deconstructed them by bending and cutting – a way of reconfiguring and addressing my memory and relation to these objects.

 

Façade, 2014

Façade, 2014

 

An Example of a graphic façade referenced by Pyszczek's work

An Example of a graphic façade referenced by Pyszczek’s work

 

View of Playground Structure (Steps) and Playground Structure (worm), 2014

View of Playground Structure (Steps) and Playground Structure (worm), 2014

 

How and where are the metal components of your recent work created?

My uncle and cousin are building contractors in Poland and work with a variety of craftspeople – metalworkers, painters, etc. I worked with them to realize the sort of metal work they create within the building projects that they regularly work on in Poland. My hand as well as the hand of the craftsperson is equally important in this work.

 

We Thank Przemek Pyszczek for this interview and images.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So Bad They’re Good

Aug 8, 2014

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Before all the controversy surrounding BADBADNOTGOOD and whether or not they are the “Futurists of Jazz” or “The Game Changers of Jazz“, there really hadn’t been much hype in the mainstream about jazz music. I hear jazz in all modern music and in my opinion the Toronto bred trio BBNG is not only modern but is the hype!

 

Here is a sample of their live performance I recorded at Union Sound Hall, a local venue in Winnipeg, a few days ago:

  

Simple Summer Cocktail

Aug 7, 2014

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Here’s a simple summer drink recipe that’s easy to make and only requires a cocktail shaker or a muddler. Instead of using a simple syrup of sugar and water, which needs to be brought to a simmer on the stove top, this drink uses an easy to make honey syrup. Simply boil some water in a kettle or on the stove and mix two parts honey to one part water.

 

In a cocktail shaker add:

– a hand full of ice
– 1oz honey syrup
– 1oz amber or spiced rum
– 10–12 mint leaves
– juice from half a lime

 

Shake and pour into a glass on top of fresh ice. The ice in the shaker will crush the mint to flavour the drink. I prefer to use a shaker instead of a muddler because it strains out the larger pieces of mint when you pour. Add soda water and stir to finish.

 

If you do not have a cocktail shaker, you can add the ingredients listed above, except for the ice, directly into a glass and use a muddler to crush the mint. Strain, if desired, and then add the ice and soda and stir. Enjoy!

Instagram: July 2014

Aug 1, 2014

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Here’s a roundup of some of our Instagram posts from July on @EQ3_Furniture.

Follow us at @EQ3_Furniture on Instagram for notices on promotions, new products, or for a look behind the scenes at EQ3.

 

 

 

Modern Classics Never Get Old

Jul 11, 2014

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Have you heard of S Style & Fashion Magazine?

 

Cover_SStyleMagazine_Summer_2014-blog

 

Inside the pages of their Summer 2014 issue, S Style explores the fresh perspective of florals in fashion and home design.

 

It’s perhaps an ironic and telling statement that the EQ3+ Marimekko Unikko Teapot made it into their botanical round-up. Having just recently celebrated its 50th Anniversary, the Unikko pattern is hardly new. Its graphic variation on nature’s poppy has been a design icon for decades (something that EQ3 Product Developer Enri touched on in this blog post on florals), and the design community continues to find new ways to bring the pattern into both their homes and their wardrobes.

 

It would seem, then, that Unikko’s newness lies in its longevity.

 

EQ3_SStyleFashion_Summer_2014-blog

 

And, couldn’t the same be said of other design classics?

 

Furniture from Mid-Century designers such as Eames, Nelson and Noguchi have been staples in the home since Herman Miller first released them back in the 1940s and 50s. They continue to be key elements in the modern interior to this day and, as part of the EQ3+ line, we’ve found they complete EQ3′s room settings with their classic design: a Marimekko Teapot adds the perfect pop of colour to EQ3′s Basics dinnerware collection, a set of Shell Chairs complement EQ3′s clean-lined dining tables, and an Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman live happily next to one of EQ3′s Canadian-made sofas.

 

Visit one of our stores for more inspiration on mixing classic and modern pieces. Or visit EQ3.com to browse EQ3′s handpicked selection of iconic designs.

 

Image Source: S Style & Fashion Magazine, Summer 2014 Issue

Shop EQ3.com For Modern Furniture and Accessories