Entries Tagged as 'Design Library'

Design Library: Atelier Bow-Wow: Behaviorology

Jul 12, 2014

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Design Volume 10: Atelier Bow-Wow: Behaviorology

Year: 2010

Category: Architecture, Science

Author: Atelier Bow-Wow

Contributors: Terunobu Fujimori, Washida Menruro, Yoshikazu Nango and Enrique Walker

Publisher: Rizzoli New York

 

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Atelier Bow-Wow is an architecture firm like no other, and a favourite of EQ3’s Creative Director Thom Fougere.

 

The Tokyo-based firm is a two-part team, made up of architects Yoshiharu Tsukamoto and Momoyo Kaijima. Known for their use of the urban vernacular, Atelier Bow-Wow follows the framework of “Void Metabolism,” designing small houses that fit between existing buildings and fill the gaps in Tokyo’s residential areas.¹

 

In their book Atelier Bow-Wow: Behaviorlogy (2010), Tsukamoto and Kaijima explore what it means to design a small house in a big, chaotic city. They present over 30 of their completed architecture projects, many of which are multi-level homes that take advantage of small, unused, and often awkward patches of land in Tokyo.

 

Each of the featured projects are truly unique, their real unifying factor being Atelier Bow-Wow’s extensive research on the behaviorology of these buildings, their environments, and their occupants. Whether its redefining the meaning of “a view” or re-imagining the stair landing as actual living space, the architecture of Atelier Bow-Wow challenges conventional space planning and design practices.

 

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In Gae House, a main floor opening floods the half-basement home office with light. Atelier Bow-Wow (2003)

 

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Windows stand in place of eaves troughs at Gae House, offering an unconventional view to the outdoors. Atelier Bow-Wow (2003)

 

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Kus House makes the most of an oddly shaped lot with its stepped facade and its wall of windows that widen with each level. Atelier Bow-Wow (2004)

 

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A cylindrical staircase connects the many levels of Kus House and provides structural support. Atelier Bow-Wow (2004)

 

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In Tread Machiya, staircase landings serve as living spaces. Atelier Bow-Wow (2008)

 

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Stair treads serve as surfaces for lamps, toss cushions and other objects in Tread Machiya. Atelier Bow-Wow (2008)

 

Tsukamoto and Kaijima’s House & Atelier Bow-Wow is a good example of their consideration towards a building’s behaviorology. Designed to function as Tsukamoto and Kaijima’s residence, as well as Atelier Bow-Wow’s head quarters, this semi-public building is nestled so tightly between adjacent houses that it is barely visible from the street.

 

Atelier Bow-Wow’s answer to these spatial constraints were exterior walls that slant inward to meet code, and large window openings to frame neighbouring houses (a mere 1 to 2 metres away). In this way, they connected their interior to its environment, rather than fought against it.

 

This section drawing from Atelier Bow-Wow and shows the studio / residence’s many levels.

This video tour of House & Atelier Bow-Wow offers another perspective.

 

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House & Atelier Bow-Wow is designed with a slanted exterior to meet code. Atelier Bow-Wow (2005)

 

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Large window openings face neighbouring houses, connecting the interior of House & Atelier Bow-Wow to its surroundings. Atelier Bow-Wow (2005)

 

 

Essays written by contributing professionals in architecture, art and sociology break-up the catalogue of work featured in Atelier Bow-Wow: Behaviorology. The book closes with a look at the art installations (or “micro public spaces”), furniture and other smaller bodies of work that have garnered Atelier Bow-Wow much international attention. You can learn more about past publications from Atelier Bow-Wow here.

 

Architecture for Long-Bodied-Short-Legged Dog, YouTube video by architecturefordogs

 

Source:

1. Atelier Bow-Wow, Terunobu Fujimori, Washida Menruro, Yoshikazu Nango and Enrique Walker (2010). Aterlier Bow-Wow: Behaviorology. Page 13. Location: New York, New York. Rizzoli International Publications, Inc.

2. Archinet.com, Atelier Bow-Wow Tokyo Anatomy (interview with Yoshiharu Tsukamoto)

Design Library: 5 San Francisco Books You Should Read this Summer

May 30, 2014

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We love sending you into the weekend with something good to read in design, art and culture.

 

Today’s installment of Design Library is extra special, because we’ve got not 1 but 5 book recommendations for you! Sticking with the theme of the week – San Francisco – we’ve compiled a list of books covering SF culture and curiosities. We’re excited to work our way through the list, and hope you are too!

 

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Cover of Meanwhile in San Francisco, Illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton

 

 

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Design Volume 09.1: Meanwhile in San Francisco: The City in It’s Own Words

Year: 2014

Category: Art, Culture

Author + Illustrator: Wendy MacNaughton

Publisher: Chronicle Books

 

This one is at the top of our list for a reason! In her book, Meanwhile in San Francisco, renowned San Francisco based artist Wendy MacNaughton takes readers on an illustrated stroll through the City by the Bay. The book is a collection of illustrations from MacNaughton’s own sketchbook, and captures the city’s culture in everything from farmer’s market vendors to San Francisco’s beloved Golden Gate Bridge. Bonus: the book jacket unfolds into an illustrated poster!

 

Meanwhile in San Francisco just hit shelves in March of this year and it’s already sold out! It might be tough to get your hands on a copy today, but you’ll be able to get your reading fix soon. Wendy says the new edition should be out any day. See you at the bookstore?!

 

 

MORE BOOKS FOR THE CURIOUS

 

Design Volume 09.2: Why is that Bridge Orange? San Francisco for the Curious

Year: 2013

Category: Travel, History, Culture

Author: Art Peterson

Publisher: Inquiring Minds Productions

 

Finally, a city guide written by someone who knows and loves the city! In Why is that Bridge Orange?, author and lifelong Bay Area resident Art Peterson looks at the everyday sights and eccentricities that make up San Francisco, and answers 86 questions you may have wondered about them. Questions like Why is that Bridge Orange? or Why is Lombard Street Crooked? It’s a tourist book for the local and the guest, alike.

 

 

Design Volume 09.3: Donald Olsen: Architect of Habitable Abstractions

Year: 2013

Category: Architecture, History

Author: Pierluigi Serraino, with Introduction by John Winter

Publisher: William Stout Publishers

 

In his book, Donald Olsen: Architect of Habitable Abstractions, author Pierluigi Serraino documents the post-war, purist houses of San Francisco based architect Donald Olsen. Serriano uses richly illustrated drawings, plans and photographs to highlight examples of Olsen’s modernist work, which was greatly influenced by the Bauhaus School of Design’s modernist movement.

 

 

Design Volume 09.4: Cool Gray City of Love: 49 Views of San Francisco

Year: 2013

Category: Travel, History, Culture

Author: Gary Kamiya

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

 

Part history, part reporting, and part lyrical prose, Cool Gray City of Love offers a portrait of San Francisco that sounds as eclectic and unpredictable as the city itself. Fourty-nine chapters tell the story of 49 specific sites or intersections in the city. A collection of 49 hand-drawn maps completes the beautiful depiction of the City by the Bay.

 

 

Design Volume 09.5: Mid-Century by the Bay

Year: 2010

Category: Architecture, Photography, History

Author: Heather M. David

Publisher: CalMod Books (California Modern)

 

Mid-Century by the Bay is a celebration of post Word War II architecture in San Francisco. Author Heather David brings us back into the past with vintage ephemera, including some of her own photography, of the post war suburbs to the futuristic commercial architecture of that time.

 

Image Source: Book cover illustration used with permission by Wendy MacNaughton

Design Library: How to Architect

May 9, 2014

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Design Library Volume 08: How to Architect

Year: 2012

Category: Architecture

Author: Doug Patt

Publisher: The MIT Press

 

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The word “architect” is a noun, but architect, entrepreneur, author and teacher Doug Patt likes to use it as a verb.

 

Patt is a registered licensed architect in Pennsylvania. He earned his degree from Penn State University, and has practiced in the field for close to two decades. During that time he also received his masters from The University of Pennsylvania and taught in the architecture programs at Pennsylvania State University and Northampton Community College. Pratt currently is a consultant in high-end residential architecture, and runs the popular website and YouTube Channel “How to Architect.”

 

In 2012, Patt published a book by the same name. How To Architect is an extension of Patt’s online video series and site, teaching readers the ABC’s of architecture. He goes through each letter of the alphabet, highlighting a specific term in each chapter that he feels is relevant to the practice of architecture. Some terms are exactly what you’d expect to find in a book about architects – terms such as Assymmetry, Building Codes, Design, Form, Invention and Proportion. But Pratt goes beyond architecture lingo and introduces the architecture culture with terms such as Ego, Kevin Bacon (turn’s out the actor’s father is an architect), Quirky and Zeal.

 

Looking to the familiar comfort of his drafting pencil, Patt introduces each chapter with a hand-drawn illustration and hand-lettered title. Additional illustrations, photographs and images further demonstrate Pratt’s ideas on architecture.

 

Together, the text and imagery of this A-Z index offer a realistic look at the glorified and the gritty sides of the profession.

 

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The Odeon of Pericles at Athens

 

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Left: University of Pennsylvania Library, Frank Furness / Right: The Provident Life & Trust Company Building, Frank Furness

 

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Glass House, Philip Johnson

 

How to Architect is a quick and easy read. We finished the 125 page soft cover book during the short flight from La Guardia, NY to Toronto. This book is for those fascinated by architecture, those aspiring to become an architect, and those established architects needing a fresh perspective on the work they do.

 

Visit howtoarchitect.com and watch Doug’s online video series for more on the subject. Here are some of our favourites:

 

Understanding Architecture (see Part 3, 6 and 9)

Draw Like an Architect (see Part 1, 2 and 5)

Could You Be an Architect? (see all)

 

Also check out Architecture and Design and Influential Architects for profiles on key industry professionals (past and present).

Design Library: Creative Block

Apr 11, 2014

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Design Library Volume 07: Creative Block

Year: 2014

Category: Art

Author: Danielle Krysa

Artworks + Photographs: by individual, featured artists (unless otherwise noted)

Publisher: Chronicle Books, LLC

 

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There’s no shame in admitting that you have creative blocks. Everyone does, including Danielle Krysa, a Canadian artist, graphic designer and blogger living in Vancouver. She had a successful career as a graphic designer and creative director, but found herself lacking confidence as an artist. She would see others’ artwork, and quickly self-doubt and jealous comparisons would set in. 

 

In an effort to kick this creative block, Danielle started The Jealous Curator: an art blog that turns her jealous “I wish I thought of that” reaction into something positive. Each day, she shares a post about contemporary art that inspires her / makes her jealous (in a good way!), and now instead of being paralyzed by comparisons, Danielle is inspired to head to the studio herself!

 

For her first book, Creative Block (2014), Danielle interviewed 50 successful artists from around the world to find out how they handle their own creative hurdles.

 

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Featured Artist / Author: Danielle Krysa

 

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Featured Artist: Jen Gotch (Page 98 – 103)

 

The series of interviews that make up this 288 page paperback give an honest and authentic look at an industry that’s often known for outward egos and hidden insecurities. Creative Block presents a mix of internationally known artists and emerging talent, revealing how both established and new artists alike respond to questions about their art, self-worth and success. The featured artists open up about their own creative blocks, what they do when they’re feeling stuck, and how they handle criticism (both from themselves and from others).

 

The book combines contemporary art images with inspiring words, tips and advice for getting unstuck on artistic projects and discovering new ideas. Each interview concludes with a challenge from the artist – a Creative unBlock Project to help readers overcome creative blocks and get inspired.

 

If you’re at all creative (or admire those who are), then this book is for you!

 

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Featured Artist: Arian Behzadi (Page 12 – 17)

 

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Featured Artist: Amanda Happé (Page 108 – 113)

 

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Featured Artist: Julia Pott (Page 256 – 261)

 

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Featured Artist: Trey Speegle (Page 74 – 79)

 

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Featured Artist: Ruan Hoffman (Page 120 – 125)

 

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Featured Artist: Ashley Goldberg (Page 240 – 243)

 

Interviews to Check Out:

 

Lisa Golightly (Page 42 – 47), Anthony Zinonos (Page 48 – 53), Matthias Heiderich (Page 54 – 59), Amanda Happé (Page 108 – 113), Leah Giberson (Page 126 – 131), Hollie Chastain (Page 138 – 143), Julia Rothman (Page 144 – 149), Ashley Goldberg (Page 240 – 243), Julia Pott (Page 256 – 261)

 

Follow Danielle at thejealouscurator.com/blog for daily posts about the artwork she’s currently loving.

Design Library: Handcrafted Modern

Mar 20, 2014

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Design Library Volume 06: Handcrafted Modern: At Home with Mid-century Designers

Year: 2010

Category: Architecture / Design, Photography

Author + Photographer: Leslie Williamson

Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications, Inc.

 

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The woven fabric cover of Handcrafted Modern is a fitting choice that nods to the book’s title and theme.

 

Leslie Williamson is a San Francisco-based photographer whose work has appeared in prestigious design and lifestyle magazines such as Dwell, Surface and Travel + Leisure.  A fan of architectural history, particularly of Modernism, Leslie’s first book Handcrafted Modern: At Home with Mid-century Designers (2010) is simply the result of her own curiosity.

 

After visiting architect Albert Frey’s home – a beautiful example of mid-century modern design in Palm Springs – Leslie went away with this question: What would an architect build for himself, without the demands of a client upon him?

 

She looked to architectural literature for answers, but found that the book she wanted to read didn’t exist yet. So, like most creative and curious people, Leslie decided to write and photograph the book herself.

 

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Handcrafted Modern is a 224 page hardcover book featuring 14 mid-century modern homes belonging to some of America’s most influential architects and designers, including Wharton Esherick, George Nakashima, Russell Wright, Harry Bertoia, and Charles and Ray Eames.

 

In an effort to document how these designers really live (or lived) on a day-to-day basis, Leslie shot only in homes where personal possessions were left largely intact (either the designer still lived there, or a museum was preserving the home as it was when the designed lived there). She shot each home with film for two full days, leaving rooms as she found them and using only natural light. As a result, the photographs featured in the book are more intimate, detailed and reflective of daily living than the images typically found in architecture books. Leslie’s photography fills the majority of Handcrafted Modern’s pages, but she breaks up the imagery with a personal account of her time shooting each home.

 

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Building on the success of Handcrafted Modern, Leslie has been working on a second book: Modern Originals: At Home with Midcentury European Designers. The new publication will be out next month (April 8th), but you can catch a sneak peek of the book here!

 

Follow Leslie’s blog lesliewilliamsonphoto.blogspot.com to see more of her photography work.

Shop EQ3.com For Modern Furniture and Accessories