Entries from June 30th, 2014

Instagram: June 2014

Jun 30, 2014

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We’re wrapping up June with an Instagram round-up from the staff at EQ3.

 

Our favourite photograph this month comes from Heather, one of EQ3’s talented in-house Graphic Designers. Heather recently treated herself to a new Fiberglass Eames Rocker from Herman Miller – lucky girl – and here it is in all its mid-century modern glory. We love how the iconic chair looks in Heather’s turn-of-the-century character apartment.

Other Instagram highlights include cabin life, shots of two of our favourite customers (one human, one furry friend), and of course, more Eames.

 

Instagrams taken by staff at our Head Office and EQ3 retail stores. For more great Instagrams, follow our company account @EQ3_Furniture.

Blogger’s Style: Amy from Love on Sunday

Jun 27, 2014

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We are excited to introduce you to EQ3’s June Blogger of the Month, Amy Del Rosario! Based in Toronto, Amy currently works as a Graphic Designer for Joe Fresh Online. In addition to her full-time gig, Amy blogs over at Love On Sunday about vintage furniture, thrifting and photography, and also contributes regularly to Emma Reddington’s widely read design blog The Marion House Book.

 

Amy’s currently loving EQ3’s Micah Floor Lamp, and recently found a spot for it in her beautiful living room. Take a look…

 

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After 3 years of living in our condo, we finally decided on the the perfect wall treatment in our living room. We went from a mirror, to a large canvas painting and now have just finished our art wall. It’s the perfect spot to display our thrifted treasures (like the large mid-century clock on the wall), photos from our travels and different art we’ve collected throughout the years. It’s probably no surprise that this is my favourite spot in our home. I love to curl up on the sectional with a good book or magazine so it’s important to have options when it comes to lighting.

 

I chose the Micah Floor Lamp because of its colour and clean lines. I love the black shade and it’s the perfect size to illuminate the space and art wall. I also love the soft lighting it provides during the evening. The angled metal base is also great for small spaces since it can be tucked under the sofa and doesn’t take up much floor space. It really has made the space a lot more cozier for relaxing nights at home.  – Amy, Love On Sunday

 

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Image Source: Photographs credited to Amy Del Rosario

#KindnessBomb Flashmob: 1000 Acts of Kindness

Jun 26, 2014

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Last summer, in conjunction with Marimekko North America, EQ3 Marimekko shop-in-shops took part in the World Karma Project’s “1000 Acts of Kindness” campaign. Each shop in shop featured a temporary art installation of 108 origami cranes, and customers were encouraged to write an act of kindness on a crane, and then to go out and do that act within 48 hours.

 

This weekend, the 1000 Acts of Kindness Origami Installation will be in London, UK for the Southbank Centre Festival of Love. Over 8 million people are expected to attend the event, and World Karma Project is inviting people from across the globe to join them on Twitter for a Kindness Bomb Flashmob!

 

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On Saturday, June 28 @WorldKarmaProj will send out 3 Tweets and a Facebook update: “Unleash #KindnessBomb #1000actsofkindness.” In true flashmob fashion, World Karma Project is encouraging everyone to complete each of their 3 kindness acts within 15 minutes of  the #KindnessBomb Tweets.

 

Of course, no good deed goes to waste, so you may complete your 3 acts of kindness anytime throughout Saturday’s event!

 

Help start the kindness ripple effect:

 

– Take photographs and feed Twitter and Facebook with the hashtag #KindnessBomb #1000actsofkindness

– Engage across muliple platforms (Reddit, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr and Twitter)

– And, of course, if you’re lucky enough to be in London, UK this Saturday, stop by the South Bank Centre Festival of Love to see the 1000 Acts of Kindnress Art Installation, and to take part in the live launch of the Kindness Bomb!

 

Follow @WorldKarmaproj on Twitter and visit the Kindness Bomb Event Page on Facebook for more details.

5 Tips for Designing With Urbio

Jun 24, 2014

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We first learned of NYC based designer and organizer, Audrey Sturdevant, during an interview with Urbio’s Co-founder Beau Oyler. When we asked Beau about interesting ways people were using Urbio products, he was quick to point out Audrey’s Instagram account.

 

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Urbio installations in the home of New York designer and organizer, Audrey Sturdevant.

 

And it’s no wonder why!

 

Audrey’s Instagram feed is chock full of Urbio. From attaching Urbio vessels to original brick, to nestling them into green “living” walls, Audrey has found creative ways to get clutter off of floors and tabletops and onto the wall.

 

“Living in a pre-war building in NYC, most of my walls are brick,” says Audrey. “My first ever Urbio project was on exposed brick using the wall pucks. With no green thumb, at the time, I instinctively used nearly weightless faux grass. Soon after, springtime came and I added fresh flowers. Our old brick walls became … a floating garden.”

 

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Audrey has used Urbio in every room in her home, and has learned plenty of lessons along the way. Here Audrey shares 5 Tips for Designing with Urbio:

 

01. Don’t be afraid of size. Those magnets are strong!

 

02. Absolutely every plant, flower, cactus or succulent will look amazing in white.

 

03. Greens are fabulous in every room of the house (try an Urbio herb garden in the kitchen).

 

04. Think outside the dirt. Urbio is a “container” after all, and it can hold just about anything. I have put Urbio to work in dozens of homes as an organizing tool. From nursery to dressing room vanities to home office – Urbio is ideal.

 

05. Paint it… the wall plate that is. I used myself as the guinea pig. I was transitioning my son’s room from baby to big boy and wanted to incorporate Urbio… of course! He was going on 3, and I told him he could choose the accent color. He chose gold. The plates took the spray paint perfectly. The ‘wide mouth’ Urbio vessel currently holds his favorite bedtime stories.

 

For more Urbio ideas, follow Audrey on Instagram @audieandthekid

 

Image Source: Audrey Sturdevant

Interview: Sam Grawe from Herman Miller

Jun 23, 2014

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We’ve referenced WHY, Herman Miller’s online essay series, a number of times on the blog. Through a collection of stories, interviews and videos, the essay series invites readers to discover why Herman Miller does what they do. Herman Miller has managed to make WHY playful, yet meaty – publishing a 4,000 word essay that doesn’t feel daunting, and a 108 second video that covers 108 years of design history.

 

Curious about the work that goes into developing these stories, we interviewed Sam Grawe, Editorial Director at Herman Miller, and the man behind the WHY series. Grawe has been interested in design since a young boy. In college, he studied art and architectural history, and it was there that he learned about 20th century design. Grawe went on to be the Editor-in-Chief of the popular architecture publication Dwell Magazine. After 11 years with the magazine, Grawe began working for Herman Miller, first as a consultant, and then as the full-time Editorial Director.

 

It comes as no surprise that he’s a modernist at heart, with Eames, Nelson and Girard topping his list of personal design heroes.

 

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Cover designs of Herman Miller’s WHY publication (print)

 

EQ3  What prompted you to move from consulting to working full-time with Herman Miller?

 

SAM GRAWE  There are very few truly design driven companies in the world, no less the United States, and Herman Miller has one of the most storied histories of design with Nelson, Eames, and Girard. All are longstanding personal heroes of mine, especially Nelson and Girard, with Nelson having been a magazine editor prior to being a furniture designer and working as the Creative Director at Herman Miller. I think it was the opportunity to work with such an incredible legacy, and to think about how to communicate that today.

 

In addition to that, just being a part of an organization that is really dedicated to problem solving design, and what that means in the 21st Century and moving forward.

 

 

EQ3  Have you always had an interest in design? Do you have a specific background in it, or is it something that has just come naturally to you?

 

SG  Actually, if I go back to my youth, I think I was pretty obsessed with Lego. Whether it was my parents telling me, or whether it was myself learning about it, I always thought I was going to be an architect. I studied architecture and architectural history, and I ended up ultimately studying art history. But, as I was studying art history, I got a little bit of 20th Century design history too.

 

Then I moved to the Bay Area in the late 90s and I became more and more interested in industrial design and furniture design. I knew that I wanted to work somehow in design. I was thinking at that time that I would go back to school for a design degree, but I ended up working for a guy named Bruce Burdick, who actually did the Burdick Table for Herman Miller in the early 80s. I worked for Bruce for probably 2 years in San Francisco, and then I started at Dwell (Magazine) in 2000, right after the first issue had been published.

 

Obviously, I had an amazing education at Dwell – eleven years there – and great exposure to contemporary architecture and to contemporary design. I had the opportunity to meet so many people and be exposed to so much. That was one of the great pleasures of that job.

 

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The Living Office is Herman Miller’s framework for understanding the future of office design.

 

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EQ3  Now, in your role at Herman Miller, what does a typical day look like for you as the Editorial Director.

 

SG  I don’t know if there is a typical day, but I am involved in a lot of different projects. I am in charge of all of the writing, but I am also in charge of my own editorial projects.

 

I also work really heavily with the brand design team that consists of all of the designers internally doing our spaces, our graphics and our digital work. “How are we conveying the messages that Herman Miller should be conveying? And, what medium are we going to use to convey it best?” And then, “How are we going to bring it to life?”

 

I’ve also been really heavily involved in the core team that has put together Living Office, which is the framework for Herman Miller’s understanding of the future of office design and work. I think anyone would tell you, at Herman Miller, that we’re kind of a meeting-based culture. There are a lot of cross-functional teams, and things happen in a pretty organic way amongst those teams.

 

 

EQ3  You mentioned about the variety of mediums that you work with. Is there a particular medium that you find most gratifying to work with?

 

SG  I think there is something, ultimately, always satisfying about print. It’s sort of finite. You can hold it in your hands, and it’s an object. Once you’re done, it’s done.

 

On the other hand, right now I have sort of an unabashed love for Instagram. I think Instagram is, for me, probably the most satisfying of social media, from both from a personal standpoint and I think we’ve been having a lot of fun with the Herman Miller Instagram account, as well. But it’s just because it’s visual, and in a way it feels less promotional than some other formats.

 

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“Alexander Girard: An Uncommon Vision” pop up celebrating first archival re-introductions of Girard’s furniture and screen printed fabric panels (New York Design Week, May 2014)

 

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EQ3  Do any particular projects, then, standout in your mind as a favourite?

 

SG  I’d have to say the recent work that we did with the pop-up showcase for Alexander Girard in New York.

 

I’ve always had a supreme passion for Alexander Girard, since a friend of mine introduced me, in probably 2001, to his work. It was less known than Nelson and Eames, at that time. In a lot of ways, his work was more ephemeral. He did textiles, and he did restaurant interiors and office interiors. Those are the kind of things that get changed or go away. I think, also, he did so much work that until you start digging, you don’t really realize that he was such a polymath and really did do everything. But when you start to discover his world, it’s just kind of amazing. It’s this endless trove of treasure.

 

In some ways it’s unfair to just put a table by him into the world, especially to a world that doesn’t know him as well as Eames or Nelson, without giving more context to what he accomplished in his lifetime.

 

 

EQ3  We’ve talked about the WHY series a fair bit on our blog and we really love it! We’re curious how this particular essay series developed because it’s a slightly different twist on a blog.

 

SG  My colleagues Steve Frykholmand Clark Malcom did a magazine called “See” in the mid 2000s, which was this beautiful high production value magazine that I think they did a total of 6 issues for, back in the day. They were just re-launching a new magazine called WHY, and that was one of the first projects that I worked on. We’ve done 3 print issues of WHY.

 

The idea is “Why does Herman Miller do the things that we do?” If there’s not a strong why, there’s kind of no point in doing it. And that’s, definitely, very much the ethos of how we approach things at Herman Miller – from our products, to our marketing, to everything. We want stuff to very much have purpose, and WHY is really the mechanism for bringing that conversation to life, whether it’s in print or it’s on social media, or in digital format. We launched last July online and I think we’ve produced something in the order of 35 stories in the last year.

 

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EQ3  Where do the ideas for stories come from? Where do you draw inspiration from?

 

SG  We work in a somewhat programmatic way with the marketing organization, so we base what we are doing on WHY with what the business is doing at the base level.

 

I’ve been able to bring in some great folk – my colleagues Amber Bravo and Everett Pelayo – that have a really good sense for editorial and for how to bring a story to life. Then we’ll take what is happening in the world of Herman Miller and we have editorial meetings. It’s a process almost like at any magazine. You have pitch meetings and you have creative meetings, and you sit around and you shoot around ideas. The one that kind of hits the nail on the head, or gets closest to it, is the one you pursue. But again, it comes back to “What’s the best way to bring this content to life.” We’re not married to any one approach. So sometimes it might be a video, sometimes it might be a photo essay, sometimes it might be a 2000 word interview.

 

 

Image Source: All photographs courtesy of Herman Miller

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